WOLFSONIAN PROFILE: LIBRARY INTERNS ALEXANDER GORDON AND JOSELYN NARANJO

For today’s blog post I thought that I would mention the work being done by two Florida International University students helping out here in the Wolfsonian library this summer. Both students had been enrolled and excelled in my spring term class, America and Movies: War Propaganda from the Spanish-American War to the Present. Working in collaboration with another student, Alexander Gordon had put together a Powerpoint presentation utilizing a number of rare library materials from the First and Second World Wars. Their project was quickly edited by myself and digitized by David Almeida and established online at the semester’s end as a virtual exhibition entitled: Patriotic Propaganda for Women and Children on the Home Front. 

As Alex had expressed an interest in some of the early twentieth-century conflicts in the Far East, we looked for a suitable project. Mr. Gordon is now reading several books penned by scholar and collection Fred Sharf of Boston, and is presently helping Associate Librarian Rochelle Pienn catalog and create metadata links for some rare books about the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905).

THE JEAN S. AND FREDERIC A. SHARF COLLECTION

These rare books, view books, and published personal narratives  recently gifted to the library by Mr. Sharf are often illustrated with photographic illustrations, engravings, and maps that help us to see the conflict as it appeared to the participants and observers of that epoch.

THE JEAN S. AND FREDERIC A. SHARF COLLECTION

After considering several possible projects, Joselyn Naranjo settled on the Great Depression and New Deal era for her project area of interest. Over the course of the last couple of weeks, she has been helping us to finish cataloguing and creating metadata links for the last of the unprocessed materials donated by Christopher DeNoon in September 2010, including some of the Federal Writers’ Project books published in the American Guide Series that encouraged domestic tourism as part of the “See America” campaign.

THE CHRISTOPHER DENOON COLLECTION FOR THE STUDY OF NEW DEAL CULTURE

She has also helped create digital links for a few new “New Deal” books and 1930s campaign propaganda recently added to the collection.

GIFTS OF MITCHELL WOLFSON, JR.

Today Ms. Naranjo assisted in the pre-selection process of gathering materials for a future library exhibit that will deal with historic election and political campaign material. Some of these items will go on public display in time for the November 2012 presidential election. Here you too can get a sneak peek at some of the items being considered for inclusion in that exhibit. The first item is a pro-Roosevelt pamphlet that shows how Roosevelt was in “good company” with other great presidents (like his distant cousin and Republican President Teddy Roosevelt) who had been similarly attacked and pilloried in the press of the times.

 

Other pamphlets printed by the Republican opposition in patriotic red, white and blue used quotes from the Democratic president and his critics to imply that Roosevelt had fallen woefully short of fulfilling his campaign promises.

 

 Other election-time publications implied that Franklin Roosevelt was a dangerous Red demagogue “Hell Bent for Election.” So much has changed in American presidential campaigns!

GIFT OF FRANCIS XAVIER LUCA AND CLARA HELENA PALACIO-DE LUCA

~ by "The Chief" on June 16, 2012.

One Response to “WOLFSONIAN PROFILE: LIBRARY INTERNS ALEXANDER GORDON AND JOSELYN NARANJO”

  1. “La historia no se repite pero rima”. Interesante blog. Muy bien sustentado.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: